miércoles, 18 de julio de 2018

Ivanka Trump announces a new White House initiative


The White House • July 18, 2018

The Day Ahead

President Donald J. Trump is hosting a meeting of his Cabinet, where he will discuss the results of his foreign trip to Europe and preview a new White House workforce initiative.
 
 

Ivanka Trump announces a new White House initiative

“The assembly line, energy plant and retail store have changed dramatically in the past 25 years—and the jobs have, too,” Advisor to the President Ivanka Trump writes in The Wall Street Journal. “Nearly 1 in 5 working Americans has a job that didn’t exist in 1980 . . . Such rapid change is one reason 6.6 million U.S. jobs are currently unfilled.”
On President Trump’s watch, the U.S. economy is adding tons of jobs—about 3 million since Inauguration Day 2017, to be exact. Many of these jobs require reskilling workers.
In the past, that hasn’t happened. “For too long, both the public and the private sectors have failed to develop innovative and effective training programs,” Ms. Trump writes. But a new Executive Order from President Trump tomorrow will help change that. In partnership with a growing list of companies and organizations, the White House’s latest initiative will set the stage for developing a National strategy for training and retraining American workers.
 
 

How President Trump is defending our election system

In his bilateral meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin this week, President Trump called out Russian efforts to undermine the United States. “During today’s meeting, I addressed directly with President Putin the issue of Russian interference in our elections,” President Trump said. “I felt this was a message best delivered in person.”
From the beginning of his Administration, President Trump has taken action to defend our election system from meddling. In March, the Administration imposed sanctions against 16 Russian entities and individuals for their roles in Russian interference in the 2016 election. The President also ordered the expulsion of 48 Russian intelligence officers from the United States in response to Russia’s use of a chemical weapon in the United Kingdom.
President Trump believes in smart engagement with Russia to promote peace and security. Meanwhile, his actions show that bold, one-on-one diplomacy goes hand-in-hand with taking a strong stand to confront all direct threats to the American homeland.
 
 

Photo of the Day


Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead
President Donald J. Trump and First Lady Melania Trump board Air Force One | July 16, 2018

In battle for Vladimir Putin’s affections, cupid favors Xi Jinping over Donald Trump | The Indian Express

In battle for Vladimir Putin’s affections, cupid favors Xi Jinping over Donald Trump | The Indian Express

In battle for Vladimir Putin’s affections, cupid favors Xi Jinping over Donald Trump

Trump's charm offensive might cause Beijing a twinge of unease, given its tumultuous history with Moscow. But in this love triangle, Putin and Xi are linked by strategic necessity, plus genuine personal affection.

By: AP | Beijing | Published: July 18, 2018 9:15:11 pm
US President Donald Trump, left, and Russian President Vladimir Putin arrive for a press conference after their meeting at the Presidential Palace in Helsinki, Finland. (AP Photo) 

In the race to woo Vladimir Putin, China’s Xi Jinping is beating Donald Trump. Trump’s quest to kindle a bromance with the Russian president has made some Americans squirm. His gushy performance in Helsinki, expressing confidence in Putin instead of US intelligence agencies, ignited outrage across the political spectrum back home.
Should Beijing worry that Trump could succeed in pulling Putin away from China? Probably not, political analysts say.
57s
Trump, Putin meet for summit in Helsinki
Russia's Vladimir Putin tells U.S. President Donald Trump that it's time to talk about relations between the two countries as the leaders meet in the Finnish capital of Helsinki.
Trump’s charm offensive might cause Beijing a twinge of unease, given its tumultuous history with Moscow. But in this love triangle, Putin and Xi are linked by strategic necessity, plus genuine personal affection.
“Trump has made clear that he is a big fan of Putin,” said Li Xin, director of the Russia center at the Shanghai Institute of Foreign Studies. “But everyone knows that Trump frequently changes his mind,” said Li. “His attempts to be friendly cannot compete with the history and the intimacy of Xi and Putin’s relationship.”
Moscow and Beijing are linked by practical and political needs. China wants Russian oil and gas to power the world’s second-largest economy. Moscow needs Chinese trade and investment more than ever following its estrangement from the West over its 2014 annexation of Crimea. They share a loathing of Islamic radicalism in Central Asia and resent US global dominance.
“Both leaders seek to curtail American influence, weaken US alliances and modify the international system so it is more favorable to them,” Bonnie Glaser of the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington said in an email.
Trump raves about Putin’s political skills, but the Chinese and Russian leaders have long enthused publicly about their unique rapport. Ahead of a visit to Beijing in June, Putin reminisced about celebrating his birthday with Xi over vodka and sausages five years ago.
“I’ve never established such relations or made such arrangements with any foreign colleague, but I did it with President Xi,” Putin told Chinese state TV.
Xi presented Putin with China’s first “friendship medal” _ an ornate gold necklace _ and called him “my best, most intimate friend.” The Russian and Chinese presidents have spent more time with one another than either has with any other foreign leader.
As far as it is possible for global leaders to become real friends, they are “setting a pretty high bar,” said Alexander Gabuev, a Sino-Russian relations expert at the Carnegie Moscow Center.
“China has nothing to worry about,” said Gabuev.
Following the Helsinki summit, China’s foreign ministry welcomed improved US-Russian relations. A spokeswoman said Beijing was “full of confidence” about its own ties with Moscow.
“China-Russia relations will not be affected by any external factors,” said Hua Chunying. Yet there is the remote possibility Washington and Moscow might one day feel the need to unite against China if its rising influence tramples their interests, suggested commentator Harry Kazianis.
“While we might rightly see Moscow as a rogue nation today, tomorrow it could be a partner in containing a common foe,” Kazianis wrote this month in The American Conservative. That is unlikely any time soon, experts say.
Trump backtracked on one of his comments after the outcry back home over his apparent dismissal of US intelligence reports that Moscow meddled in the 2016 election. Rather than view Trump as a rival for Russia’s friendship, China is more likely to be pleased by the growing split between Trump and American allies in Europe.
“Beijing has better ties with both Washington and Moscow than they have with each other,” Glaser said. “China likely expects that Trump’s visit will not change this reality.”
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Women have fundamental right to enter Sabarimala temple: Supreme Court | The Indian Express

Women have fundamental right to enter Sabarimala temple: Supreme Court | The Indian Express

Women have fundamental right to enter Sabarimala temple: Supreme Court

Earlier in January this year, the Travancore Devaswom Board (TDB), which manages the Sabarimala Temple, had decided to make proof-of-age documents mandatory for female devotees at the shrine.

By: Express Web Desk | New Delhi | Updated: July 18, 2018 9:17:48 pm
Several women activists have opposed the ban on the entry of women inside the temple. (File Photo)



Hearing the contentious issue relating to the ban on entry of women between 10 and 50 years of age in Kerala’s historic Sabarimala temple, the Supreme Court on Wednesday observed that a woman’s right to pray is equal to that of a man and it should not be dependent on law.
“Your (intervener) right to pray being a woman, is equal to that of a man and it is not dependent on a law to enable you to do that,” observed Justice DY Chandrachud.
The Chief Justice of India while hearing the matter observed, “On what basis you (temple authorities) deny the entry. It is against the Constitutional mandate. Once you open it for public, anybody can go.”
Sabarimala Temple entry issue: "On what basis you (temple authorities) deny the entry. It is against the Constitutional mandate. Once you open it for public, anybody can go," observes the Chief Justice of India
The apex court began hearing the case on Tuesday and asked the counsel for petitioners Indian Young Lawyers’ Association and others to limit their arguments on the questions of reference made by a three-judge bench of apex court last year. The top court had last year asked a constitutional bench to examine the legality of the ban on entry of women in the age group of 10-50 at the temple.
The bench also comprising Justices R F Nariman, A M Khanwilkar, D Y Chandrachud and Indu Malhotra fixed the time limit for the counsel for petitioners and asked them to try to wrap up their arguments within the fixed time limit.
Meanwhile, Kerala minister K Surendran said that government is in favour of women’s entry inside the temple. “The State government’s stand is that women should be allowed to offer prayers in Sabarimala Temple. We have filed an affidavit in the Supreme Court explaining our stand. Now it has to take a decision. We are bound to obey its verdict. Devaswom board now has the same opinion as that of government,” Surendran told reporters.
Several women activists have opposed the ban on the entry of women inside the temple. Earlier in January this year, the Travancore Devaswom Board (TDB), which manages the Sabarimala Temple, had decided to make proof-of-age documents mandatory for female devotees at the shrine.


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OÍDO AL PASAR

el dispreciau ha oído al pasar: ...la clase política no se ha dado cuenta que la gente "mortal" e "inocente", no es estúpida... JULIO 18, 2018.-
la clase política insulta la inteligencia pública
la clase política insulta la consciencia social
la clase política sigue sin entender que toda la humillación que genera, finalmente le vuelve...

‘Excited to get past this nightmare’: Immigrant children describe hunger, cold in detention | The Indian Express

‘Excited to get past this nightmare’: Immigrant children describe hunger, cold in detention | The Indian Express



‘Excited to get past this nightmare’: Immigrant children describe hunger, cold in detention

The children's descriptions of various facilities are part of a report filed in federal court this week in Los Angeles in a case over whether the Trump administration is meeting its obligations under a long-standing settlement governing how young immigrants should be treated in custody.

By: AP | California | Published: July 18, 2018 9:34:08 am
'Excited to get past this nightmare': Immigrant children describe hunger, cold in detention
File – In this June 23, 2018, file photo, an immigrant child looks out from a U.S. Border Patrol bus leaving as protesters block the street outside the U.S. Border Patrol Central Processing Center in McAllen, Texas. (AP)

Wet and muddy from their trek across the Mexican border, immigrant children say they sat or lay on the cold, concrete floor of the immigration holding centers where they were taken. It was hard to sleep with lights shining all night and guards kicking their feet, they say. They were hungry, after being given what they say were frozen sandwiches and smelly food.
Younger children cried in caged areas where they were crammed in with teens, and they clamored for their parents. Toilets were filthy, and running water was scarce, they say. They waited, unsure and frightened of what the future might bring. “I didn’t know where my mother was,” said Griselda, 16, of Guatemala, who entered the U.S. with her mother in the McAllen, Texas, area. “I saw girls ask where their mothers were, but the guards would not tell them.”
The children’s descriptions of various facilities are part of a voluminous and at times scathing report filed in federal court this week in Los Angeles in a case over whether the Trump administration is meeting its obligations under a long-standing settlement governing how young immigrants should be treated in custody.
Dozens of volunteer lawyers, interpreters and other legal workers fanned out across the Southwest in June and July to interview more than 200 immigrant parents and children in holding facilities, detention centers and a youth shelter.
Advocates said the government isn’t complying with the decades-old Flores agreement, which lays out detention conditions and release requirements for immigrant children. “They have spoken out loud and clear, and what they’ve said is they are experiencing enforced hunger, enforced dehydration, enforced sleeplessness,” said Peter Schey, an attorney for the children who has asked the court to appoint a special monitor to enforce the agreement. “They are terrorized, and I think it is time for the courts and the public to hear their voices.”
'Excited to get past this nightmare': Immigrant children describe hunger, cold in detentionImmigrant children now housed in a tent encampment under the new “zero tolerance” policy by the Trump administration are shown walking in single file at the facility near the Mexican border in Tornillo, Texas (Reuters)
The Department of Homeland Security, which oversees immigration and border enforcement, did not immediately comment. But in their own reports to the court last month, government monitors said that immigration authorities were complying with the settlement agreement.
In his report, Henry Moak Jr., juvenile coordinator for U.S. Customs and Border Protection, documented the air temperature as appropriate at a number of border facilities and said he drank the water himself from five-gallon containers at a processing center in McAllen. He said some children and parents told him they disliked the food and weren’t sure the water was drinkable, but there were no allegations the food was spoiled.
At the Yuma station in Arizona, he said he tried the water there, too, and, “I can confirm the water fountains worked and the water tasted clean.” The litany of complaints compiled by advocates comes after a global outcry drove the Trump administration to stop separating immigrant families at the border. Authorities are now reuniting parents and children under a separate court order and said they will seek to detain families together during their immigration proceedings, though under the Flores agreement immigrant children are generally supposed to be released from custody in about 20 days.
Many of the children described conditions in U.S. Customs and Border Protection facilities where they were taken and processed in the initial days after crossing the border. They were identified in the reports solely by their first names.
Timofei, a 15-year-old from Russia who sought asylum at the border with his parents over their beliefs as Jehovah’s Witnesses, said night and day blended together in the locked, crowded room where he was held with other boys. It had a single window overlooking an empty corridor, he said. He said there was no soap in the bathroom, and he only sometimes got a single-use toothbrush. He said he was offered a shower upon arriving at the San Ysidro, California, facility but didn’t take one and wasn’t allowed one on his second or third day there.
'Excited to get past this nightmare': Immigrant children describe hunger, cold in detentionFILE – In this Sunday, June 17, 2018, file photo provided by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, people who’ve been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas. (AP)
Some children were later sent to the Casa Padre shelter in Texas for immigrant children traveling alone or who were separated from their parents. The facility operates under a contract with the Department of Health and Human Services. There, teenage boys described going hungry and not being given enough time to speak with their parents by phone.
Kenneth Wolfe, a spokesman for HHS’s Administration for Children and Families, said the agency wouldn’t comment on specific cases but if a contractor doesn’t comply with agency procedures, the issue is addressed.
Also in Texas, Keylin, a 16-year-old girl from Honduras, said she traveled north with her mother after her mother’s life was threatened back home. The pair turned themselves in at the border near McAllen and were taken to a facility she called the “ice box” because it was so cold.
A day later, they were taken to a facility with caged areas she called the “dog house.” There, they were separated and allowed to speak once for 10 minutes over the next four days, she said.
In both places, the food was frozen and smelled bad and she couldn’t eat it, she said. She said female guards yelled at her and other girls and made them strip naked and leered at them before they showered. “I was very frightened and depressed the entire time. I was scared of the guards and scared I would be deported without my mother,” she said, adding they were later reunited and sent to a family detention center.
Angel, a 13-year-old who came from Mexico with his mother, said guards told boys in his cell in McAllen, Texas they were going to be adopted and wouldn’t see their parents again. He was later sent to family detention with his mother where he said they passed an asylum screening and were awaiting release. “I am excited to get out of here and get past this nightmare,” he said.
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Syria: Intense government bombing in Nawa kills 12 | The Indian Express

Syria: Intense government bombing in Nawa kills 12 | The Indian Express

Syria: Intense government bombing in Nawa kills 12

Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said an overnight 'frenzied' bombing campaign continued into Wednesday, with at least 350 missiles lobbed into Nawa and its surrounding areas.

By: AP | Beirut | Updated: July 18, 2018 1:22:04 pm
Syria, Southwestern Syria, Nawa, Syria bombing, Syria war, Syria rebels, Syria government, Syria Human Rights observatory, 12 killed in Syrian bombing, 100 injured Nawa bombing, World news, Indian Express
Nawa, southwestern Syria saw intense bombing, which killed at least 12 people and injured 150. (Source: Reuters photo)

Syrian rescue workers and a war monitor say talks to cede the largest opposition holdout in southwestern Syria to the government have failed, triggering an intense bombing campaign on the densely populated town that killed a dozen people and injured over a hundred.
Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said an overnight ‘frenzied’ bombing campaign continued into Wednesday, with at least 350 missiles lobbed into Nawa and its surrounding areas. The Observatory said at least 12 were killed as rescuers struggled to get to the casualties.
1m 34s
Air strikes launched in Syria after chemical weapon attack
A series of missile strikes have been launched against Syria by the US, UK and France in response to the suspected chemical weapons attack in Douma a week ago.
Khaled Solh, head of the local Syrian civil defence known as White Helmets, said only one ambulance was able to access the town and civilians relied on their cars to bring out at least 150 injured.
Talks to hand over the town faltered Tuesday.
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Syrian rebels, Iran reach deal to evacuate villages: report | The Indian Express

Syrian rebels, Iran reach deal to evacuate villages: report | The Indian Express

Syrian rebels, Iran reach deal to evacuate villages: report

There was no official word on the deal but state-owned Ikhabriyah television station said there were "reports of an agreement to liberate thousands from the two towns".

By: Reuters | Amman | Published: July 18, 2018 9:45:44 am
Syrian rebels, Iran reach deal to evacuate villages: report
Smoke following an explosion in Syria. Syrian rebels and Iranian-backed negotiators have reached a deal to evacuate thousands of people from two rebel-besieged Shi’ite villages. (Reuters/Ronen Zvulun/File)

Syrian rebels and Iranian-backed negotiators have reached a deal to evacuate thousands of people from two rebel-besieged Shi’ite villages in northwestern Syria in return for the release of hundreds of detainees in state prisons, opposition sources said.
They said the negotiators from Hayat Tahrir al-Sham, a rebel coalition spearheaded by Syria’s former al Qaeda offshoot Nusra Front, and Iran’s Revolutionary Guards had agreed all residents would be evacuated from the mostly Shi’ite villages of al-Foua and Kefraya in Idlib province.
1m 25s
Syrian army lays siege to Deraa rebel enclave
The Syrian army and allied troops laid siege to the rebel-held enclave in Deraa on Monday and were poised to gain complete control of the city where the uprising against President Bashar al-Assad's rule first erupted.
A commander in the regional alliance that backs President Bashar al-Assad said 100 buses were heading to the two towns to evacuate around 6,000 alongside 300 Alawite civilians held by rebels.
“We now are working on the logistical arrangements,” said an Islamist rebel source familiar with the secret negotiations that Turkey was also involved in and which builds on a deal reached last year that was never fully implemented.
In April 2017, thousands of people in the two Shi’ite towns were evacuated to government-held areas in a swap that in exchange freed hundreds of Sunnis living in former rebel-held Madaya and Zabadani who were then besieged by Lebanon’s Iranian-backed Hezbollah group.
But the evacuation of the remaining 7,000 people in al-Foua and Kefraya in exchange for the release of 1,500 detainees prisoners never went through.
The resumption of talks now to complete the deal was to ward off a possible military campaign by the Syrian army and Iranian backed militias to end the siege of the two Shi’ite towns, another opposition source said.
An opposition source familiar with the talks told Reuters t more than 1,500 civilian and rebel prisoners would be released.
The deal also includes the release of 34 prisoners captured by Hezbollah during its siege of the Madaya and Zabadani.
There was no official word on the deal but state-owned Ikhabriyah television station said there were “reports of an agreement to liberate thousands from the two towns”.
Iran, which backs Assad against the mainly Sunni insurgents and has expanded its military role in Syria, has long taken an interest in the fate of its co-religionists in the two towns.
It has arranged dozens of air lifts of food and equipment to circumvent the rebel siege of the two towns.
Past deals have mostly affected Sunni Muslims living in former rebel-held areas surrounded by government forces and their allies after years of sieges that have in some cases led to starvation.
Damascus calls them reconciliation deals. Rebels said it amounts to forced displacement of Assad’s opponents from main urban centres in western Syria and engenders demographic change because most of the opposition, and Syria’s population, are Sunni.
But backed militarily by Russia and Shi’ite regional allies, Assad, a member of Syria’s Alawite minority, has negotiated the deals from a position of strength.
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