jueves, 19 de julio de 2018

Our pledge to America’s workers


The White House • July 19, 2018

The Day Ahead

President Donald J. Trump will sign an Executive Order that sets the stage for developing a National strategy for workforce development. Watch live at 3 p.m. ET.
 
 

Our pledge to America’s workers

The over 3.2 million jobs created on President Trump’s watch have benefited a diverse span of Americans: women, manufacturers, Hispanic Americans, African Americans, young people, people with disabilities, and more. Many groups that have struggled historically are seeing their unemployment levels now hit record lows.
Many of these jobs require new skills. “We want to make sure that we have the workforce development programs we need to ensure these jobs are being filled by American workers,” President Trump says.
Today, President Trump will be joined by Ivanka Trump and more than 20 companies and organizations in pledging their unwavering commitment to America’s workforce. The President will sign an Executive Order that establishes the National Council for the American Worker, charged with developing a real National strategy to address workforce development. Among other tasks, the Council will help expand the number of apprenticeships available to Americans today.
 
 

A fix for our deteriorating National Park System

“America’s National Park System is the envy of the world,” Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke writes this week. “Our parks tell the story of our nation, ranging from the origins of the American conservation ethic, to our sacred battlefields, to the Civil Rights Movement. Quite frankly, our American park system represents our American values.”
Our parks drew 330 million visitors last year, and we now risk loving them to death, Secretary Zinke explains. “The backlog of critical maintenance and repairs in the National Park Service stands at $11.6 billion.” Until recently, addressing that backlog seemed out of reach.
President Trump supports a bipartisan bill, now before the Senate, that would preserve the splendor and beauty of our National Parks. The President’s 2019 budget request to Congress proposed the largest investment in public lands infrastructure in American history. In that spirit, President Trump’s leadership is bringing both parties together to protect our National heritage.
 
 

Photo of the Day


Official White House Photo by D. Myles Cullen
President Donald J. Trump holds a Cabinet meeting | July 18, 2018

Amid criticism over Putin summit, Donald Trump wants second meeting | The Indian Express

Amid criticism over Putin summit, Donald Trump wants second meeting | The Indian Express

Amid criticism over Putin summit, Donald Trump wants second meeting

Trump tweeted a list of topics discussed at the summit, including terrorism, security for Israel, Mideast peace, Ukraine, North Korea and more, and wrote: "There are many answers, some easy and some hard, to these problems... but they can ALL be solved!"

By: AP | Washington | Published: July 19, 2018 8:58:24 pm
US President Donald Trump shakes hand with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Helsinki. (AP)



President Donald Trump said Thursday he wants a second meeting with Russia’s Vladimir Putin to start implementing ideas they discussed at the Helsinki summit. Pushing back against criticism of first meeting, Trump accused the news media of trying to provoke a confrontation with Moscow that could lead to war, although concerns about the summit came have been raised by a broad cross-section of Republicans and Democrats.

Trump tweeted a list of topics discussed at the summit, including terrorism, security for Israel, Mideast peace, Ukraine, North Korea and more, and wrote: “There are many answers, some easy and some hard, to these problems… but they can ALL be solved!”
1m 38s


Trump: Putin summit 'easiest' part of Europe tour
President Trump said on Tuesday that compared to his meetings with NATO leaders and a visit to the UK this week, his coming summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin may be the 'easiest of all'.
“I look forward to our second meeting so that we can start implementing some of the many things discussed,” he wrote.
Helsinki Summit takeaways: Donald Trump doubts intel, plays trusted friendU.S. President Donald Trump and Russia’s President Vladimir Putin shake hands as they meet in Helsinki, Finland July 16, 2018. REUTERS
Despite bipartisan criticism, Trump pointed blame at the media, tweeting: “The Fake News Media wants so badly to see a major confrontation with Russia, even a confrontation that could lead to war. They are pushing so recklessly hard and hate the fact that I’ll probably have a good relationship with Putin. We are doing MUCH better than any other country!”
“The Summit with Russia was a great success, except with the real enemy of the people, the Fake News Media,” he tweeted.
Numerous lawmakers have criticized Trump for his post-summit statements raising doubts about Russia’s meddling in the 2016 U.S. elections, and past and current intelligence community officials also differed with many of his statements.
FILE – In this July 16, 2018, file photo, U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Russian President Vladimir Putin arrive for a press conference after their meeting at the Presidential Palace in Helsinki, Finland. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)
Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., a Trump ally, acknowledged Thursday that Trump has had a “bad week” on Russia.
“I think it’s imperative that he understand that he’s misjudging Putin,” Graham told reporters. “I don’t think he was prepared as well as he should have been.”
Graham says Trump is right to criticize previous administrations for their handling of Russia. But he says Trump “is not making the problem better, he’s making it worse.”
Thursday marked the third day of Trump trying to manage the political fallout from his widely criticized performance at the summit meeting with Putin in Finland.
Putin, in his first public comments about the summit, told Russian diplomats Thursday that U.S.-Russian relations are “in some ways worse than during the Cold War,” but that the meeting with Trump allowed them to start on “the path to positive change.”
Russia’s President Vladimir Putin speaks during an interview with Fox News after a meeting with U.S. President Donald Trump in Helsinki,
“We will see how things develop further,” Putin said, evoking unnamed “forces” in the U.S. trying to prevent any improvement in relations and “putting narrow party interests above the national interest.”
Trump had toughened his tone about Russia on Wednesday, saying in a CBS News interview that he told the Russian president to his face during Monday’s summit to stay out of America’s elections “and that’s the way it’s going to be.”
That rhetoric marked a turnabout from Trump’s first, upbeat description of the sit-down. Still, Trump backtracked on whether Russia is currently targeting U.S. elections. Asked the question Wednesday, he “no” answer put him sharply at odds with recent public warnings from his own intelligence chief.
Hours later, the White House stepped in to say Trump’s answer wasn’t what it appeared.
The zigzagging laid bare the White House’s search for a path out of trouble that has dogged the administration’s discussions of Russia from the start, but spiraled after Trump’s trip to Helsinki.
Helsinki Summit takeaways: Donald Trump doubts intel, plays trusted friendU.S. President Donald Trump and Russia’s President Vladimir Putin shake hands during a joint news conference after their meeting in Helsinki, Finland, July 16, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
The scale of the bipartisan outcry at Trump’s stance toward Putin has only been rivaled by his 2017 waffling over condemning white supremacist demonstrators in Charlottesville, Virginia.
Trump has refined and sharpened his presentation since Helsinki.
At the news conference with Putin, he was asked if he would denounce what happened in 2016 and warn Putin never to do it again, and he did not directly answer. Instead, he delivered a rambling response, including demands for investigation of Hillary Clinton’s email server and his description of Putin’s “extremely strong and powerful” denial of meddling.
Trump asserted Wednesday at the White House that no other American president has been as tough on Russia. He cited U.S. sanctions and the expulsion of alleged Russian spies from the U.S., telling reporters that Putin “understands it, and he’s not happy about it.”
The muddied waters have deepened critics’ concerns that Trump is not taking threats to the U.S. electoral system seriously enough. Pressed on why Trump has repeatedly passed on opportunities to publicly condemn Putin’s actions, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders suggested Trump was working to make the most of an “opportunity” for the two leaders to work together on shared interests.
One such opportunity is what Trump termed an “incredible offer” from Putin to allow the U.S. access to Russians accused of election hacking and other interference. In exchange, Putin wants Russian interviews of Americans accused by the Kremlin of unspecified crimes.
Sanders said Trump was still weighing the offer with his team, adding, “We’ve committed to nothing.” Russian officials have said they want to interview Kremlin critics Bill Browder and former U.S. Ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul.
McFaul tweeted Wednesday that he hoped the White House would denounce “this ridiculous request from Putin.”
Lawmakers have urged Trump to reject the deal.
A number of senators are swiftly signing on to a bipartisan bill from Sens. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., to slap new sanctions on Russia or any other country caught posting ads, running fake news or otherwise interfering with election infrastructure.
Sanders called the legislation “hypothetical” and declined to say whether the president would back it.
Two other lawmakers, Sens. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., and Chris Coons, D-Del., will try to force a vote Thursday on a resolution backing the intelligence community’s findings that Russia interfered in the 2016 election and must be held accountable. A similar House vote Tuesday failed on a party-line vote.
At the Hudson Institute think tank in Washington last Friday, Coats said, “We are not yet seeing the kind of electoral interference in specific states and voter databases that we experienced in 2016; however, we fully realize that we are just one click on a keyboard away from a similar situation repeating itself.”
His comments came the same day the Justice Department unveiled an indictment against 12 Russian military intelligence officers for their role in hacking Democratic groups during the 2016 campaign.
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Ivanka Trump: Training for the Jobs of Tomorrow


Ivanka Trump: Training for the Jobs of Tomorrow

“On Thursday the president will sign an executive order to prioritize and expand workforce development so that we can create and fill American jobs with American workers,” Advisor to the President Ivanka Trump writes in The Wall Street Journal.

“Nearly 1 in 5 working Americans has a job that didn’t exist in 1980,” Ms. Trump adds. “Such rapid change is one reason 6.6 million U.S. jobs are currently unfilled.”

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“Sadly, the media had little interest in delving into important issues that Presidents Trump and Putin discussed, including nuclear nonproliferation, destroying ISIS, ending the civil war in Syria, preventing Iran from building atomic bombs, and the security of Israel,” David Bossie writes in Fox News. “Reporters could barely acknowledge the positive sight of former Cold War adversaries talking about peace.”
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“The 2018 Helsinki Summit is yet more evidence that Trump’s bold approach to international diplomacy is reviving America’s clout on the global stage,” Paris Dennard argues in The Hill. “President Trump knows that in order to make deals, you actually need to sit down and speak directly with adversaries and allies alike.”
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In The Washington Times, Dave Boyer reports that “a plurality of voters supports the confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh, including nearly one in five Democrats,” according to a new Morning Consult/POLITICO survey.
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“President Donald Trump has struck a deal with The Boeing Company for a new generation of two Air Force One aircrafts at a lower cost than originally proposed,” Saagar Enjeti reports for The Daily Caller. The deal saves taxpayers “over $1.4 billion from the initially proposed $5.3 billion cost-plus contract,” Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said.
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“Thanks to tax reform, Complex Chemical Company Incorporated of Tallulah, Louisiana, is hiring more workers, raising wages, and making critical new investments that will help grow their business,” Christopher Netram writes for the National Association of Manufacturers.

Donald Trump strikes back at critics of Helsinki summit with Vladimir Putin - Washington Times

Donald Trump strikes back at critics of Helsinki summit with Vladimir Putin - Washington Times

Trump strikes back after criticism of Helsinki summit with Putin

President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media as he meets with members of Congress in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Tuesday, July 17, 2018, in Washington. Trump says he meant the opposite when he said in Helsinki that he doesn't see why Russia would have interfered in the 2016 U.S. elections.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media as he meets with members of Congress in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Tuesday, July 17, 2018, in Washington. Trump says he meant the opposite when he said in ... more >
 - The Washington Times - Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez slammed by Democrats: Her socialist dreams 'would bankrupt the country' - Washington Times

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez slammed by Democrats: Her socialist dreams 'would bankrupt the country' - Washington Times

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez slammed by Democrats: Her socialist dreams 'would bankrupt the country'

In this Wednesday June 27, 2018, file photo, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, left, the winner of New York's Democratic Congressional primary, greets supporters following her victory, along with Saikat Chakrabarti, founder of Justice Democrats and senior adviser for her campaign.  Ocasio-Cortez is back on the campaign trail, but this time in the Midwest. The 28-year-old Democratic rising star is stumping for two young, progressive Democrats hoping to win Democratic primaries in Kansas and Michigan. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
In this Wednesday June 27, 2018, file photo, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, left, the winner of New York’s Democratic Congressional primary, greets supporters following her victory, along with Saikat Chakrabarti, founder of Justice Democrats and senior adviser for her campaign. Ocasio-Cortez is ... more >
 - The Washington Times - Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Donald Trump's Vladimir Putin charm offensive aims to detach Russia from China, experts say - Washington Times

Donald Trump's Vladimir Putin charm offensive aims to detach Russia from China, experts say - Washington Times

Trump charm offensive a strategic bid to detach Russia from China: experts

U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, shake hand at the beginning of a meeting at the Presidential Palace in Helsinki, Finland, Monday, July 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, shake hand at the beginning of a meeting at the Presidential Palace in Helsinki, Finland, Monday, July 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) more >
 - The Washington Times - Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Trade-war concerns cloud New York City investment conference | The Indian Express

Trade-war concerns cloud New York City investment conference | The Indian Express

Trade-war concerns cloud New York City investment conference

US President Donald Trump is largely perceived on Wall Street as a pro-business leader but his hard-line stance on trade could jeopardize economic gains created by his tax cuts, investors said.

By: Reuters | New York | Published: July 19, 2018 7:32:44 am
Trade-war concerns cloud New York City investment conference
Kenneth Griffin, founder and CEO of Citadel, takes part in a panel discussion at the 2011 The Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California May 3, 2011. (Reuters Photo/File)

A prolonged US trade war with China and Europe would dent global economic growth and force investors to reassess the profitability of US companies, some of the biggest hedge funds and private equity investors in the United States warned at an investment conference on Wednesday.
Hedge fund manager Kenneth Griffin, who runs $30 billion Citadel, said at the CNBC Institutional Investor Delivering Alpha Conference that tariffs are “damning to consumers, to companies, and to capital formation.”
1m 12s
Trump sets $50 billion in China tariffs
U.S. President Donald Trump announced hefty tariffs on $50 billion of Chinese imports on Friday as Beijing threatened to respond in kind, in a move that looks set to ignite a trade war between the world's two largest economies.
Earlier this month the United States and China slapped tariffs on $34 billion of each other’s imports in an escalating trade tussle that has roiled financial markets. The United States has raised the stakes in the dispute, threatening to slap 10 percent tariffs on an extra $200 billion worth of Chinese imports, including numerous consumer items.
Griffin and the other investors sounded a nervous message on US trade policies as many big investment firms this month prepare to release quarterly earnings reports that could eventually be impacted by the growing friction.
Howard Marks, co-chairman of $121 billion Oaktree Capital Group Llc, said tariffs and trade wars are now “real issues” a mere eight months after no one listed them as key problems for investors.
And Jonathan Gray, president and chief operating officer at $449 billion Blackstone Group LP, said trade tensions, particularly with China, pose “risks for all of us as investors.”
The money managers all spoke at the conference on Wednesday, two days after Laurence Fink, who runs $6.3 trillion investment firm BlackRock, warned that deepening trade friction could sufficiently unnerve investors to send markets tumbling as much as 15 percent.
US President Donald Trump is largely perceived on Wall Street as a pro-business leader but his hard-line stance on trade could jeopardize economic gains created by his tax cuts, investors said.
“A prolonged trade war will slow global growth,” Griffin said at the conference. “We don’t want to be with the tariffs,” he added, saying they could hurt US companies’ ability to compete around the world. Investors might reassess the profitability of US companies that would be hurt by the tariffs, the speakers at the event said.
Gray said there were big issues at stake but sounded a more optimistic note that differences could be resolved. “There is a collective self-interest to try and resolve this,” he said.
The same investment conference featured an appearance by Trump’s senior economic adviser, Larry Kudlow, who also addressed the topic of China and trade wars. Kudlow runs the National Economic Council.
While some investors had hoped Kudlow might use the occasion to dial back some of Trump’s rhetoric and calm Wall Street’s nerves, he backed his boss fully.
Although he told the audience of institutional investors and hedge fund managers that he is not a “big fan of tariffs,” he added he has long been a critic of China’s policies.
Kudlow said the ball is now in China’s court but noted that President Xi Jinping is not ready to compromise and is “holding up the game.”
Said Kudlow: “Don’t blame Trump. Blame China, blame Europe.”
“At the moment the trade negotiations are kind of stalled,” he said, noting he thinks the “president is doing exactly the right thing.”
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