domingo, 18 de agosto de 2019

Worries on the horizon for Angela Merkel | World News, The Indian Express

Worries on the horizon for Angela Merkel | World News, The Indian Express

By Deutsche Welle |Published: August 18, 2019 5:16:42 pm

Worries on the horizon for Angela Merkel

From climate change and trembling spells to a trembling government, German Chancellor Angela Merkel faces many challenges as she returns to office post-vacation.

Worries on the horizon for Angela Merkel
Merkel has already said she would not contest another general election, and there were signs this week that the notoriously reserved chancellor was beginning to open up emotionally in the final leg of her tenure. (Reuters)


Chancellor Angela Merkel sat down on Wednesday as she welcomed Lithuanian President Gitanas Nauseda in Berlin to the tune of military bands playing national anthems outside the chancellery.

Peru: Protesters march to denounce violence against women | World News, The Indian Express

Peru: Protesters march to denounce violence against women | World News, The Indian Express

By Deutsche Welle |Published: August 18, 2019 5:54:11 pm

Peru: Protesters march to denounce violence against women

Gender and domestic violence are serious problems in Peru, with many Peruvian women reporting instances of physical or emotional abuse. Violence against women in the Latin American country occurs in all social strata and in both rural and urban areas.

Peru Lima women protest, Crime against women Peru, Latin america crime against women
The protesters demand justice for victims of gender violence and measures by the government to protect women and girls.


Hundreds of women took to the streets of Lima on Saturday to protest the crimes being committed against women and girls in Peru. The demonstration, organized by the collective Ni Una Menos (Not One More), has been the fourth such national march so far this year.

The skew in education | The Indian Express

The skew in education | The Indian Express



The skew in education

Poor quality government schools make higher education out of reach for non-elite . That’s the real problem, not public-funded universities.

The skew in education
The phrase, “let the elite pay” refuses to acknowledge that if the government schools continue to be of poor quality, the non-elite will always find it difficult to reach higher education.


In his article, ‘Let the elite pay’ (IE, June 23), Surjit Bhalla argues for the continuation of the highly discriminatory school and higher education systems that already provide education to most on the basis of ability to pay. He acknowledges that “children of the poorest of the poor”do not receive basic quality education and hence cannot compete with children of the rich. However, Bhalla refuses to question the existence of an unequal schooling system.

Inside Track: Savarkar No RSS Fan | The Indian Express

Inside Track: Savarkar No RSS Fan | The Indian Express



Inside Track: Savarkar No RSS Fan

During the famine of the 1950s, Vinayak Damodar Savarkar advocated that vegetarians should take to eating fish and eggs. The radical reformist Savarkar and RSS chief M S Golwalkar never really got along.

Bhima-Koregaon case
The radical reformist Savarkar and RSS chief M S Golwalkar never really got along.


Vinayak Damodar Savarkar is today venerated as the father of Hindutva by the Sangh Parivar. They seem unaware that some of Savarkar’s beliefs fly in the face “of conservative political opinion, but would find a resounding echo in liberal chambers”.

History Headline: Aksai Chin, from Nehru to Shah | The Indian Express

History Headline: Aksai Chin, from Nehru to Shah | The Indian Express



History Headline: Aksai Chin, from Nehru to Shah

Sixty years ago, from the very spot Amit Shah reiterated the Indian position on Aksai Chin, prime minister Jawaharlal Nehru had informed the nation, belatedly, about what the Chinese had been up to in Aksai Chin, “where not even a blade of grass grows”.



(From left) Nehru with Chinese premier Chou en-Lai, Chinese foreign minister Chen Yi and Union minister Swaran Singh in New Delhi in April 1960. (Express Archive)


37,244 square kilometres of land. That’s almost Bhutan, almost Kerala, almost Manipur and Nagaland put together. That’s Aksai Chin, the north-eastern end of India’s crown under Chinese occupation for many decades now, the first move made much before the Sino-Indian war of 1962. It’s a cold desert of salt flatlands called the Soda Plains, watered by the Karakash, the Black Jade river. China claims much of it lies in Hotan County of Xinjiang. The China National Highway 219, running over 2,000 km, connects Yecheng in Xinjiang to Lhatse in Tibet via Aksai Chin. An asphalt road since 2013, it was a gravel track when it was completed in 1957.

Govt must control narrative on Jammu and Kashmir | The Indian Express

Govt must control narrative on Jammu and Kashmir | The Indian Express



Govt must control narrative on Jammu and Kashmir

If Hindus outnumbered Sikhs in Punjab, would that be ethnic cleansing of Sikhs? If Kashmir is no longer a Muslim-majority province, it will become more like secular India than before.

Govt must control narrative on J&K
Warn the thousands rushing to settle in Kashmir just to prove they can do it —Kashmir gets very cold in winter!


One lesson for those in politics is never to believe your own propaganda but pay special attention to what your opponents are saying rather than just call it fake news. The government managed a swift and unanticipated surgical strike on Article 370. But that done, it has been unable to keep the initiative. Why not say that a week- or fortnight-long curfew is not unusual in Kashmir as has happened before at times of security emergency? Instead we have the Governor saying it is all peace and quiet while the military and the administration say curfew will continue. It is no good saying a majority of J&K citizens are in favour but a few troublemakers are not. Political activists in every country and every party are always a minority. Astute politics lies in letting the activists expose themselves as representing a minority.

Nothing scares Pakistanis more than the possibility that India could succeed and Pakistan fail | The Indian Express

Nothing scares Pakistanis more than the possibility that India could succeed and Pakistan fail | The Indian Express

Nothing scares Pakistanis more than the possibility that India could succeed and Pakistan fail

The core problem is that if India becomes a mighty economic superpower and Pakistan remains a bankrupt nuclear power, then the whole exercise of breaking India to make a nation for the ‘pure’ could become meaningless.

Kashmir, Pakistan on Kashmir, India Pakistan Kashmir, UNSC on Kashmir, Kashmir Pakistan UNSC, UNSC Poland, Poland on India Pakistan ties, Article 370 Kashmir, Modi BJP Kashmir, UNSC Poland Pakistan, Indian Express
There is nothing that the military men next door would like more than to see the Indian economy collapse once more into that socialist sluggishness that kept us behind Pakistan right up to the end of the Licence Raj.


Some years ago when relations with Pakistan were in a good season, the Indian cricket team went on tour to the Islamic Republic. When they played in Lahore, many Indian cricket fans crossed the border to lend the team support. The Indian economy in those days was bursting with animal spirits. So among these fans were Indian industrialists who descended in private jets. A Pakistani friend said later that it was when they saw those private jets arrive that they first realised how far ahead of Pakistan the Indian economy had gone. It was good to see, she added, that it was not just Arab billionaires who were having all the fun. But, I knew from the way she said this that actually most Pakistanis were not happy about this.