lunes, 25 de junio de 2018

OÍDO AL PASAR

el dispreciau ha oído al pasar: no se construye desde el caos... no se construye desde la destrucción sistemática... no se construye arrasando sociedades humanas... no se construye equidad desde el ejercicio de la inequidad... la clase política global anda carente de ideas, también de capacidades... el poder global anda deficiente de conocimientos y mucho más de talentos... los resultados demandan tiempo, y debe ser desarrollados partiendo de premisas sociales definidas... pretender resultados a partir del caos es propio de mentes vacías... JUNIO 25, 2018.-

los problemas sociales se resuelven cuando hay voluntad de hacerlo... la clase política no tiene dicha voluntad y el poder global (oculto detrás del imperio) tampoco... por ende, reina la inequidad y domina la zozobra social... en dicho concierto desconcertante, la sociedad humana se consume en el caos que los propios estados ausentes fabrican para asegurar su subsistencia miserable...

una sociedad humana sin derechos humanos y ciudadanos garantizados, sólo conduce hacia el caos... ¿es eso lo que pretende el poder?, indudablemente...

Half of EU business leaders cut UK investment over Brexit: report | The Indian Express

Half of EU business leaders cut UK investment over Brexit: report | The Indian Express

Half of EU business leaders cut UK investment over Brexit: report

Asked whether punishing Britain for leaving the EU or continuing to trade on preferential terms was more important, 96 percent of respondents to the survey said trade was more important than teaching London a lesson for Brexit.

By: Reuters | Frankfurt | Published: June 25, 2018 7:20:26 am
Half of EU business leaders cut UK investment over Brexit: report
Prime Minister Theresa May’s spokeswoman said the government was confident of getting a good deal ensuring trade is as free and frictionless as possible.  (Reuters Photo/File)

Britain’s looming departure from the European Union has led nearly half of big companies from the rest of the bloc to cut investment in the country, a poll of 800 executives released two years after the Brexit referendum found.
The survey, by law firm Baker & McKenzie, also found that three quarters of bosses wanted Brussels to make concessions to Britain to secure a better trading relationship after it leaves the EU in early 2019.
1m 26s
U.N. denounces 'shameful' treatment of migrants by Europe
U.N. refugee chief Filippo Grandi condemned the European Union for its ‘shameful’ refugee policy after both Italy and Malta turned away a ship carrying hundreds of migrants.
“It’s very clear that, especially German companies, think that Brexit is bad for business,” said Anahita Thoms, a trade partner at Baker & McKenzie in Duesseldorf.
Germany’s BDI industry group warned last week that Britain is heading towards a disorderly Brexit that could have disastrous consequences.
Airbus has said a withdrawal without a deal would force the aircraft maker to reconsider its long-term position and put thousands of British jobs at risk.
However, Prime Minister Theresa May’s spokeswoman said the government was confident of getting a good deal ensuring trade is as free and frictionless as possible.
Asked whether punishing Britain for leaving the EU or continuing to trade on preferential terms was more important, 96 percent of respondents to the survey said trade was more important than teaching London a lesson for Brexit.
There was also a majority view that business leaders had not been properly consulted, or their views taken into account, by the EU negotiating team as it tries to hammer out a post-Brexit trade deal.
Two thirds of respondents said they wanted a free-trade deal while 45 percent were in favour of a customs union, Baker & McKenzie said.
The law firm surveyed executives in France, Germany, Sweden, Ireland, Spain and the Netherlands working at companies in a range of industries with annual sales of at least 250 million pounds ($330 million).
Britons voted on June 23, 2016 to leave the EU.
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Koreas discuss removing North’s artillery from tense border | The Indian Express

Koreas discuss removing North’s artillery from tense border | The Indian Express

Koreas discuss removing North’s artillery from tense border

North Korea has deployed an estimated 1,000 artillery pieces along the border, posing a significant threat to Seoul and the metropolitan area.

By: AP | Seoul | Published: June 25, 2018 3:18:09 pm
south korea, olympic flame, 2018 Pyeongchang Games, psyeongchang games, sports news, indian express
Rival Koreas are discussing relocating North Korea’s artillery system from tense border. (AP file photo)

The rival Koreas are discussing the possible relocation of North Korea’s long-range artillery systems away from the tense Korean border, the South’s prime minister said Monday, as the countries forge ahead with steps to lower tensions and extend a recent detente.
North Korea has deployed an estimated 1,000 artillery pieces along the border, posing a significant threat to Seoul and the metropolitan area.
1m 0s
U.S. indefinitely suspends some more training exercises with S.Korea
The United States and South Korea have agreed to indefinitely suspend two exchange program training exercises, the Pentagon said on Friday, a sign that promises made during the Trump-Kim summit are being kept.
In a speech marking the 68th anniversary of the outbreak of the 1950-53 Korean War, Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon said that “moving (North Korea’s) long-range artillery to the rear is under discussion,” as he explained what types of good-will steps between the sides have been taken in recent months.
Lee’s comments appear to be Seoul’s first official confirmation of media reports that South Korea demanded that the North reposition its forward-deployed artillery pieces during inter-Korean military talks this month. Seoul’s Defense Ministry, which has denied those reports, said it had no immediate comment on Lee’s speech.
A 2016 South Korean defense white paper described the North’s long-range artillery as one of the country’s biggest threats, along with its nuclear and missile programs. Seoul, a capital city with 10 million people, is about 40-50 kilometers (25-30 miles) from the border.
South Korean media speculated that during the June 14 military talks, the North likely demanded that South Korea and the United States withdraw their own artillery systems from the border as a reciprocal measure. About 28,500 U.S. soldiers are deployed in South Korea.
Also Monday, military officers from the two Koreas met to discuss how to fully restore their military hotline communication channels, according to the South’s Defense Ministry. The results of the talks were expected later Monday.
The talks came a day after Seoul said it would “indefinitely suspend” two small-scale annual military drills with the United States. The drills involving marines from the allies were supposed to occur from July to September, according to a statement from South Korea’s Defense Ministry. It said South Korea is willing to take unspecified additional measures if North Korea is continuously engaged in “productive” negotiations.
Last week, South Korea and the United States announced the suspension of their larger, annual military exercises called the Ulchi Freedom Guardian, part of their efforts to increase the chances of successful nuclear diplomacy with North Korea. Some experts say the drills’ suspension could weaken the allies’ combined defense posture against North Korea.
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Donald Trump for quick deportation of illegal immigrants; says current immigration system ‘unfair’ | The Indian Express

Donald Trump for quick deportation of illegal immigrants; says current immigration system ‘unfair’ | The Indian Express

Donald Trump for quick deportation of illegal immigrants; says current immigration system ‘unfair’

Indian-Americans, most of whom are highly skilled and came to the US mainly on H-1B work visas, are the worst sufferers of the current immigration system which imposes a seven per cent per country quota on allotment of green cards or permanent legal residency.

By: PTI | Washington | Published: June 25, 2018 1:37:13 pm
Donald Trump for quick deportation of illegal immigrants; says current immigration system 'unfair'
US President Donald Trump has been calling for a merit-based immigration system, a move that would benefit the Indian professionals. (AP Photo)

President Donald Trump has called for the quick deportation of illegal immigrants who “invade” the US, lamenting that the current immigration system is “unfair” to those who came legally to America.
Indian-Americans, most of whom are highly skilled and came to the US mainly on H-1B work visas, are the worst sufferers of the current immigration system which imposes a seven per cent per country quota on allotment of green cards or permanent legal residency.
1m 27s
Trump, U.S. Republicans to meet amid furor over immigrant children
President Donald Trump, facing a blast of criticism for the detention of children separated from their immigrant parents at the U.S.-Mexico border, was slated to meet with Republican lawmakers on Tuesday ahead of votes on immigration legislation.
As a result, the current wait period for Indian skilled immigrants, as per some unofficial estimates, can be as long as 70 years.
“Our immigration policy, laughed at all over the world, is very unfair to all of those people who have gone through the system legally and are waiting on line for years! Immigration must be based on merit – we need people who will help to ‘Make America Great Again’,” Trump said in a tweet.
“We cannot allow all of these people to invade our Country. When somebody comes in, we must immediately, with no Judges or Court Cases, bring them back from where they came. Our system is a mockery to good immigration policy and Law and Order. Most children come without parents…” Trump said in another tweet.
The focus on immigration came after the president last week signed an executive order, keeping some families together after his administration was urged to stop separating children from parents.
Trump’s tweets could be seen as support to thousands of Indians waiting in line for their green card, an overwhelming majority of whom are highly educated professionals.
But because of the country-limit, Indians in many cases have to wait for more than a decade to get legal permanent residency.
Despite steps by lawmakers from both the Republican and Democratic parties, the Congress has been unable to lift the country-limit.
President Trump has been calling for a merit-based immigration system, a move that would benefit the Indian professionals.
In a series of tweets, Trump blamed the opposition Democrats for the broken immigration system.
“Democrats, fix the laws. Don’t RESIST. We are doing a far better job than (George W) Bush and (Barack) Obama, but we need strength and security at the Border! Cannot accept all of the people trying to break into our Country. Strong Borders, No Crime!
In the past also, Trump has favoured a merit-based immigration system which, according to him, would attract the best and the brightest from across the world to the US.
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‘Ready, fire, aim’ — critics see pattern to Donald Trump’s approach | The Indian Express

‘Ready, fire, aim’ — critics see pattern to Donald Trump’s approach | The Indian Express

‘Ready, fire, aim’ — critics see pattern to Donald Trump’s approach

From immigration to health care to trade and more, Trump's pattern has been to outline a plan with scant concern or preparation for its immediate impact or consequences and to make changes on the fly with the same lack of planning.

By: AP | Washington | Published: June 25, 2018 9:52:10 am
'Ready, fire, aim' — critics see pattern to Donald Trump's approach
US President Donald Trump. According to his critics, he has been outlining plans with scant concern or preparation for its immediate impact or consequences. (Reuters Photo/File)

Maybe it’s not so easy after all. US President Donald Trump’s struggles to push immigration legislation through Congress and his about-face on breaking up immigrant families are putting a spotlight on his competence in carrying out his policies.
The fallout from Trump’s handling of the separation of immigrant children from their families, which led to a sharp reversal from the president, has been reminiscent of the chaos sparked when Trump opened his administration by imposing a travel ban on immigrants entering from majority Muslim countries.
1m 27s
Trump, U.S. Republicans to meet amid furor over immigrant children
President Donald Trump, facing a blast of criticism for the detention of children separated from their immigrant parents at the U.S.-Mexico border, was slated to meet with Republican lawmakers on Tuesday ahead of votes on immigration legislation.
Taken together, the events demonstrate how little Trump appears to have learned or adjusted his approach after that first rocky encounter with governing. From issue to issue, from immigration to health care to trade and more, Trump’s pattern has been to outline a plan with scant concern or preparation for its immediate impact or consequences, and to make changes on the fly with the same lack of planning.
The result has often gone far beyond bureaucratic confusion, and has, at times, inflicted painful and unexpected consequences on people’s lives.
“It’s not something that appreciates these young children and was certainly done in a `ready, fire, aim’ way, obviously,” said Republican Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, describing the administration’s immigration policy. “There was no preparation for it.”
Trump implemented a major new policy this spring with no apparent plan or new resources to handle the influx of people who would be detained and prosecuted as a result. When a public outcry ensued, the administration could not answer basic questions about it. Trump then changed the way the policy worked — leaving officials within the administration and at the border confused on how to enact the changes. Plus, it took several days for the government to say how it planned to reunite families and where the separated children were located.
Trump’s struggles on immigration follow his failure last year to repeal the so-called Obamacare law, a central tenet of GOP orthodoxy since President Barack Obamasigned it into law in 2010, and the president’s uneven implementation of his travel ban, which will be the subject of a Supreme Court ruling this week. New tariffs have strained relationships with European and North American allies and his Middle East peace plan is still under development amid a standoff with the Palestinians after he said the decades-old problem wouldn’t be hard to solve.
Trump has often mused since the 2016 presidential campaign that it would be “so easy” to pass a sweeping immigration law and construct a “big, beautiful” border wall, paid for by Mexico. Earlier this week, he tweeted that his Democratic leadership adversaries in Congress, Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York and Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California, would be “forced to do a real deal, so easy, that solves this long time problem.”
But the upcoming week could offer fresh evidence that the reality of governing is much more challenging.
Republicans are seeking to steer an immigration bill through the House despite skepticism among conservatives and uncertainty about Trump’s commitment to the plan. The president told House Republicans he was “1,000 percent” behind their effort last week but then suggested just three days later on Twitter that Republicans wait until after the fall midterm elections.
Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas, the chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, said he received assurances from the White House during the weekend that Trump was “still 100 percent behind us.” But the fate of the bill remains in doubt and it remains unclear if House Republicans could pass a narrower version that would only address the separation of children and their families.
Confusion has lingered over Trump’s border policy, meanwhile. After a public uproar over the “zero tolerance” policy that led to more than 2,300 immigrant children being separated from their families near the Mexican border, the president signed an executive order last week for the children to be brought back together with their families. The order seeks to keep families together in detention instead of separating them while their legal cases are heard by the courts.
A 1997 landmark case known as the Flores settlement governs how children are handled in immigration custody and generally prevents the government from keeping them in detention, even with their parents, for more than 20 days. Trump is seeking to amend the agreement to allow for families to be detained indefinitely together. But Justice Department has said the 20-day policy remains in effect until Congress or the courts take action to change that.
That means if Congress fails to pass legislation or the courts decline to change the terms of the settlement, the administration could be forced to again separate the immigrant children from their parents in three weeks.
In the meantime, officials have issued conflicting signals over the state of the administration’s policy and some parents have said they don’t yet know where there children are.
Trump tweeted Sunday that the U.S. “cannot allow all of these people to invade our Country.” He said when someone attempts to enter illegally, “we must immediately, with no Judges or Court Cases, bring them back from where they came. Our system is a mockery to good immigration policy and Law and Order.”
The American Civil Liberties Union said that is both illegal and unconstitutional.
Trump also continued to blame Democrats in the Republican-controlled Congress, saying House Republicans could “easily pass” a strong border security bill, but it would still have to pass the Senate “and for that we need 10 Democrat votes, and all they do is RESIST.”
Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., a frequent Trump critic, said the problem was larger than a partisan fight.
“When the president says that and calls them clowns and losers, how does he expect the Democrats to sit down and work with Republicans on these issues? And so words matter. What the president says matters. And he ought to knock that off,” Flake said.
Paul Light, a professor of public service at New York University, said the federal government is not the “agile instrument” for policy that Trump seems to think it is.
“It’s very difficult to make a U-turn, then make another U-turn,” Light said, adding that’s exactly what Trump did last week in signing the executive order after he and other administration had insisted for days that their hands were tied and that only Congress had the power to step in and do something.
“He sees decisions like ordering at McDonald’s. You order, it comes, good-bye,” Light said. “That’s not the way government works.”
Corker spoke on CBS’ “Face the Nation,” McCaul spoke on “Fox News Sunday” and Flake appeared on ABC’s “This Week.”
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Migrants ‘knock at front door’ for asylum after Trump crackdown | The Indian Express

Migrants ‘knock at front door’ for asylum after Trump crackdown | The Indian Express

Migrants ‘knock at front door’ for asylum after Trump crackdown

Many of the dozens of migrants interviewed by Reuters said they decided to present an official asylum request after hearing about parents being separated from children when crossing the US border illegally, and about friends making successful requests.

By: Reuters | Mexico, Tijuana | Updated: June 25, 2018 8:38:50 am
Migrants 'knock at front door' for asylum after Trump crackdown
Following an outcry at home and abroad over his administration’s “zero tolerance” policy, US President Donald Trump issued an executive order last week to end the family separations. But over 2,000 children are yet to be reunited with their parents. (Reuters file photo)

More Mexicans and Central Americans are lining up to make asylum requests at the US-Mexico border as word spreads of a US crackdown on families crossing illegally and the threat of brutal gangs lying in wait if they go it alone.
Officials at shelters in border cities, as well as migrants from Mexico and Central America, told Reuters there was a rising number of people waiting, often for weeks, to make asylum pleas to immigration authorities at official border crossings.
1m 43s
Trump creates "space force" as new military arm
U.S. President Donald Trump on Monday said he was ordering the establishment of a sixth branch of the military to clear the way for American dominance of space. Colette Luke has more.
Many of the dozens of migrants interviewed by Reuters said they decided to present an official asylum request after hearing about parents being separated from children when crossing the US border illegally, and about friends making successful requests.
Following an outcry at home and abroad over his administration’s “zero tolerance” policy, US President Donald Trump issued an executive order last week to end the family separations. But over 2,000 children are yet to be reunited with their parents.
The migrants, many with children in tow, told harrowing tales of kidnapping, extortion and murder by gangs in Mexico and Central America. That threat was enough to inspire the perilous journey in hope of receiving asylum in the United States.
“They don’t go through the mountains or deserts anymore, they go to the front door,” said Victor Clark Alfaro, a migration expert at San Diego State University. But their chances of asylum may be diminishing.
On June 11, US Attorney General Jeff Sessions overturned a grant of asylum to a Salvadoran domestic abuse victim, potentially excluding immigrants seeking refuge from sexual, gang and other forms of violence in their homelands.
Those threats were the basis of a “credible fear” argument that could prevent them from being returned. That risk has yet to deter migrants.
WAITING GAME
Shelters run by charities in Reynosa, Tijuana and Nogales – Mexican cities separated by hundreds of miles along the border – all reported an uptick in migrant asylum seekers.
Marla Conrad, a coordinator at the Kino Border Initiative in Nogales, said that so far this month, she had seen about an extra 100 people lining up for asylum compared with May.
At the border in Tijuana, 26-year-old Jose Cortes from El Salvador, travelling with his 5-year-old daughter, said the waiting list to request asylum was now 1,150 people long. When he arrived two weeks ago, it had 1,000 names on it.
Migrants manage the waiting list, a task currently with Cortes. When his turn comes to cross into the United States for an asylum interview, he will pass the list to another migrant.
It is growing even as 30 to 60 people are called up daily to plead their cases with US border agents.
Mexican Jacqueline Moreno, 43, said that as recently as December, her daughter managed to cross and successfully request asylum on the same day. Now, fleeing violence in her home state of Michoacan with her son, 13, Moreno said she had been waiting three weeks.
MANY MORE PEOPLE
Some migrants followed tips from their hometowns about how to seek asylum. Others paid thousands of dollars to people smugglers, or “coyotes,” who assured them a case could be made.
Many stay near the border in spartan shelters, with rows of brightly coloured tents, or in dingy hotels often charging prices they struggle to pay.
Patricia Flores and her 7-year-old son are among thousands of Central Americans waiting at the border.
After witnessing a gangland killing in their neighbourhood, Flores decided to pay $4,000 to a human smuggler who told her she could just get to the border and ask for asylum.
Flores has been desperately trying to get a meeting at the border but said she had been turned away by Mexican officials. Her son described how he saw his neighbour shot in the head back in El Salvador.
“My mom said it’s our secret but if I tell anyone, I am going to go to heaven. I don’t want to,” he said, adding he was not afraid. Pointing to his green T-shirt with a cartoon on it, he said that was his “bulletproof jacket.”
Adelia Contini, from Brazil, has run a church-funded shelter for women and children in Tijuana for nine years. She too has noticed an increase in asylum seekers.
“Since 2013, we started seeing more people asking for asylum, but not as much as now,” she said. “Since January, there are many more people, more than last year.”
‘WAITING TO KILL US’
Encouraged by relatives and friends in the United States, Honduran Lorena Mejia has been waiting for two weeks in a shelter in Reynosa near the banks of the Rio Grande with her husband and four children to apply for asylum.
Returning home did not bear thinking about, Mejia said, explaining that she and her family had been threatened because they witnessed a massacre in Honduras a few years ago.
“We can’t go back there. They’re waiting to kill us,” the 31-year-old said, adding that two other witnesses had already been murdered. “We have to get in.”
Sharon Melissa Analco, 23, arrived in Tijuana on Friday with her 5-year-old daughter, fleeing kidnappers terrorizing her family in Acapulco in the violent Mexican state of Guerrero.
Analco said she had no money to pay for her stay, having expected to be able to get right into the United States. But a US official turned her away at the crossing, telling her she would have to put her name on a list and wait her turn.
“I can’t wait out there,” she recalled telling the official, weeping on the plaza next to the border. “I’m in danger.”
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